FEMALE HAIR LOSS

Female hair loss can be caused by a variety of factors, including genetics, hormonal imbalances, certain medications, medical conditions, and physical or emotional stress.

Genetics is the most common cause of hair loss. Male pattern hair loss (MPHL) and female pattern hair loss (FPHL) are the most common types of genetic hair loss and have similar pathophysiology. MPHL is caused by an inherited sensitivity to the hormone dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which can cause hair follicles to shrink and eventually stop producing hair. FPHL is also caused by genetics, but the exact mechanism is not fully understood and is thought to involve multiple hormones. Both MPHL and FPHL typically manifest as thinning hair on the top of the scalp and are most common in people between the ages of 40 and 60.

Other causes of hair loss include medical conditions such as autoimmune diseases, infections, and dermatological conditions, as well as certain medications and physical or emotional stress. If you are experiencing hair loss, it is important to speak with a healthcare provider or a hair loss specialist to determine the cause and appropriate treatment. There are several treatments available for hair loss, including medications, hair restoration surgery, and lifestyle changes, and the best course of action will depend on the underlying cause of the hair loss.

Other causes of hair loss include:

  • Hormonal imbalances: Hormonal imbalances can cause hair loss, particularly changes in levels of testosterone and estrogen. Hormonal imbalances can be caused by a variety of factors, including pregnancy, menopause, and certain medical conditions such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).
  • Certain medications: Some medications, such as chemotherapy drugs and certain blood pressure medications, can cause hair loss as a side effect.
  • Medical conditions: Certain medical conditions, such as autoimmune diseases (e.g. lupus) and infections (e.g. ringworm), can cause hair loss.
  • Physical or emotional stress: Physical stress, such as surgery or severe illness, or emotional stress can cause hair loss, often in the form of telogen effluvium, which is a temporary form of hair loss that typically resolves on its own.

Treatment options for hair loss depend on the underlying cause of the hair loss. Medications, such as minoxidil and finasteride, can be effective in treating male genetic hair loss. Hair restoration surgery, such as hair transplantation, can also be an option for some people. Lifestyle changes, such as modifying one’s diet and reducing stress, may also be helpful in preventing or improving hair loss. Treating hormonal imbalances or It is important to speak with a healthcare provider or a hair loss specialist to determine the best course of action for your specific case.

FEMALE HAIR TRANSPLANT 

Female hair transplant surgery is a procedure in which hair is moved from a donor area, usually the back of the head, to a recipient area where there is thinning or baldness. The hair follicles are removed from the donor area and transplanted to the recipient area, where they continue to grow and produce hair. Hair transplant surgery can be an effective treatment for hair loss, particularly for male pattern baldness and female pattern hair loss. However, it is important to keep in mind that hair transplant surgery is a surgical procedure with risks and limitations, and it is not suitable for everyone; this is particularly true for female hair loss sufferers. It is important to speak with a qualified hair transplant surgeon to determine if hair transplant surgery is a suitable option for you.

THE RIGHT CANDIDATES FOR HAIR TRANSPLANT

Factors that may affect your suitability for hair transplant surgery include the extent and pattern of your hair loss, the overall health of your scalp, the thickness and quality of your hair, and your overall health. Your hair transplant surgeon will assess these factors and determine if hair transplant surgery is a suitable option for you. For female patients, determining whether or not there is thinning in the traditional donor area (as female pattern hair loss can affect this region as well) is arguably the most important element of determining surgical candidacy. All female patients must be evaluated by an experienced hair restoration doctor to ensure the donor is stable and can be used for surgery. Many times female hair loss can be treated non-surgically as well. A hair restoration doctor may recommend a visit to a specialist, such as an endocrinologist, to have lab work and possibly a biopsy done. This may lead to a non-surgical treatment, like an oral medication or an injection, being used opposed to surgery.